blog - Dave's Blog


Search

erictanart:I wish there was a #biffs to go to. #backtothefuture...

Feb 28, 2:39


erictanart:

I wish there was a #biffs to go to. #backtothefuture #bttf #matchbookart

PermalinkComments

Retweet of edent

Feb 26, 3:16
Facebook Mangles Unicode URLs https://shkspr.mobi/blog/?p=20643 
PermalinkComments

nickholmes:HOW CAN THERE BE GLOBAL WARMING?!

Feb 24, 3:35


nickholmes:

HOW CAN THERE BE GLOBAL WARMING?!

PermalinkComments

scottaukerman:ifc: Comedy Bang! Bang! Passes The Mic To Kid...

Feb 19, 3:21


scottaukerman:

ifc:

Comedy Bang! Bang! Passes The Mic To Kid Cudi

BIG NEWS FOLKS. Kid Cudi will be Scott’s new co-star when Reggie departs.

Please welcome my new co-star, partner and bandleader, Kid Cudi! Watch him one the couch this Friday, and then every week starting this summer on IFC.

PermalinkComments

laughingsquid:A Fun Offbeat Parody of the ‘Jurassic World’...

Feb 17, 5:53


laughingsquid:

A Fun Offbeat Parody of the ‘Jurassic World’ Teaser Trailer Featuring Raptors on Motorcycles

PermalinkComments

Retweet of JustRogDigiTec

Feb 13, 6:54
Still on the fence if this is good for the web. Love the progress!! “@shanselman: Flash isn't dead. It's undead. http://www.hanselman.com/blog/JavaScriptHasWonRunFlashWithMozillaShumwayAndDevelopSilverlightInJSWithFayde.aspx …
PermalinkComments

Tweet from David_Risney

Feb 11, 1:12
Months later still can't stop watching @MattBesser and The Vandals 'Its Got To Be Ska'. http://www.ifc.com/shows/comedy-bang-bang/blog/2014/10/cbb-the-vandals-ska-extended-song … Besser skanking is the best.
PermalinkComments

npr:The jobs picture has changed profoundly since the 1970s....

Feb 6, 10:50


npr:

The jobs picture has changed profoundly since the 1970s. This map shows how that has played out across the country.

Map: The Most Common Job In Every State

Source: IPUMS-CPS/ University Of Minnesota
Credit: Quoctrung Bui/NPR

PermalinkComments

Retweet of reinpk

Feb 1, 9:44
New blog post on software layers replacing middle management: http://rein.pk/replacing-middle-management-with-apis/ …
PermalinkComments

Retweet of ericlaw

Jan 27, 11:08
I recently got a new Authenticode cert to continue to sign my code. It wasn't hard-- you should be signing too! http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ieinternals/archive/2015/01/28/authenticode-in-2015-signcode-with-certificate-on-etoken.aspx …
PermalinkComments

ericlaw: A nice look at HTTP/2 in practice, including use of data frame padding to attempt to thwart datalength-leak attacks.

Jan 15, 9:32
Eric Lawrence @ericlaw :
A nice look at HTTP/2 in practice, including use of data frame padding to attempt to thwart datalength-leak attacks. http://blog.httpwatch.com/2015/01/16/a-simple-performance-comparison-of-https-spdy-and-http2/ …
PermalinkComments

Image Manipulation in PowerShell - Windows PowerShell Blog - Site Home - MSDN Blogs

Jan 5, 1:20

Great blog post and set of powershell scripts for manipulating images.

PermalinkCommentsprogramming coding powershell

99percentinvisible: Walking was invented in Europe, according...

2014 Sep 29, 2:50


99percentinvisible:

Walking was invented in Europe, according to this sign found by a friend in China. 

PermalinkCommentshumor walking china

mostlysignssomeportents: More than 90% of Americans believe...

2014 Jun 7, 9:55


mostlysignssomeportents:

More than 90% of Americans believe that the US government is unduly influenced by money, and the Mayday.US super PAC is raising $5M to fund the election campaigns of politicians who’ll pledge to dismantle super PACs and enact other campaign finance reforms. They raised more than $1M in 30 days last month, and this month, the goal is $5M. It’s the brainchild of Lawrence Lessig, who’s going to run prototype the project by running five electoral campaigns in 2014, and use the lessons of those projects to win enough anti-corruption seats in 2016 to effect real change.

Again, I’m not able to contribute to Mayday.US, because I’m a Canadian and Briton. But I ask my American friends to put in $10, and promise that I’ll put CAD1000 into any comparable Canadian effort and/or £1000 into a comparable UK effort. We all win when countries embrace evidence-based policy guided by doing what’s best for its citizens, rather than lining the pockets of corrupting multinationals.

Mayday.US

Please reblog!

PermalinkComments

Debugging anecdote - the color transparent black breaks accessibility

2014 May 22, 10:36

Some time back while I was working on getting the Javascript Windows Store app platform running on Windows Phone (now available on the last Windows Phone release!) I had an interesting bug that in retrospect is amusing.

I had just finished a work item to get accessibility working for JS WinPhone apps when I got a new bug: With some set of JS apps, accessibility appeared to be totally broken. At that time in development the only mechanism we had to test accessibility was a test tool that runs on the PC, connects to the phone, and dumps out the accessibility tree of whatever app is running on the phone. In this bug, the tool would spin for a while and then timeout with an error and no accessibility information.

My first thought was this was an issue in my new accessibility code. However, debugging with breakpoints on my code I could see none of my code was run nor the code that should call it. The code that called that code was a more generic messaging system that hit my breakpoints constantly.

Rather than trying to work backward from the failure point, I decided to try and narrow down the repro and work forwards from there. One thing all the apps with the bug had in common was their usage of WinJS, but not all WinJS apps demonstrated the issue. Using a binary search approach on one such app I removed unrelated app code until all that was left was the app's usage of the WinJS AppBar and the bug still occurred. I replaced the WinJS AppBar usage with direct usage of the underlying AppBar WinRT APIs and continued.

Only some calls to the AppBar WinRT object produced the issue:

        var appBar = Windows.UI.WebUI.Core.WebUICommandBar.getForCurrentView(); 
// appBar.opacity = 1;
// appBar.closeDisplayMode = Windows.UI.WebUI.Core.WebUICommandBarClosedDisplayMode.default;
appBar.backgroundColor = Windows.UI.Colors.white; // Bug!
Just setting the background color appeared to cause the issue and I didn't even have to display the AppBar. Through additional trial and error I was blown away to discover that some colors I would set caused the issue and other colors did not. Black wouldn't cause the issue but transparent black would. So would aqua but not white.

I eventually realized that predefined WinRT color values like Windows.UI.Colors.aqua would cause the issue while JS literal based colors didn't cause the issue (Windows.UI.Color is a WinRT struct which projects in JS as a JS literal object with the struct members as JS object properties so its easy to write something like {r: 0, g: 0, b: 0, a: 0} to make a color) and I had been mixing both in my tests without realizing there would be a difference. I debugged into the backgroundColor property setter that consumed the WinRT color struct to see what was different between Windows.UI.Colors.black and {a: 1, r: 0, g: 0, b: 0} and found the two structs to be byte wise exactly the same.

On a hunch I tried my test app with only a reference to the color and otherwise no interaction with the AppBar and not doing anything with the actual reference to the color: Windows.UI.Colors.black;. This too caused the issue. I knew that the implementation for these WinRT const values live in a DLL and guessed that something in the code to create these predefined colors was causing the issue. I debugged in and no luck. Now I also have experienced crusty code that would do exciting things in its DllMain, the function that's called when a DLL is loaded into the process so I tried modifying my C++ code to simply LoadLibrary the DLL containing the WinRT color definition, windows.ui.xaml.dll and found the bug still occurred! A short lived moment of relief as the world seemed to make sense again.

Debugging into DllMain nothing interesting happened. There were interesting calls in there to be sure, but all of them behind conditions that were false. I was again stumped. On another hunch I tried renaming the DLL and only LoadLibrary'ing it and the bug went away. I took a different DLL renamed it windows.ui.xaml.dll and tried LoadLibrary'ing that and the bug came back. Just the name of the DLL was causing the issue.

I searched for the DLL name in our source code index and found hits in the accessibility tool. Grinning I opened the source to find that the accessibility tool's phone side service was trying to determine if a process belonged to a XAML app or not because XAML apps had a different accessibility contract. It did this by checking to see if windows.ui.xaml.dll was loaded in the target process.

At this point I got to fix my main issue and open several new bugs for the variety of problems I had just run into. This is a how to on writing software that is difficult to debug.

PermalinkCommentsbug debug javascript JS technical windows winrt

location.hash and location.search are bad and they should feel bad

2014 May 22, 9:25
The DOM location interface exposes the HTML document's URI parsed into its properties. However, it is ancient and has problems that bug me but otherwise rarely show up in the real world. Complaining about mostly theoretical issues is why blogging exists, so here goes:
  • The location object's search, hash, and protocol properties are all misnomers that lead to confusion about the correct terms:
    • The 'search' property returns the URI's query property. The query property isn't limited to containing search terms.
    • The 'hash' property returns the URI's fragment property. This one is just named after its delimiter. It should be called the fragment.
    • The 'protocol' property returns the URI's scheme property. A URI's scheme isn't necessarily a protocol. The http URI scheme of course uses the HTTP protocol, but the https URI scheme is the HTTP protocol over SSL/TLS - there is no HTTPS protocol. Similarly for something like mailto - there is no mailto wire protocol.
  • The 'hash' and 'search' location properties both return null in the case that their corresponding URI property doesn't exist or if its the empty string. A URI with no query property and a URI with an empty string query property that are otherwise the same, are not equal URIs and are allowed by HTTP to return different content. Similarly for the fragment. Unless the specific URI scheme defines otherwise, an empty query or hash isn't the same as no query or hash.
But like complaining about the number of minutes in an hour none of this can ever change without huge compat issues on the web. Accordingly I can only give my thanks to Anne van Kesteren and the awesome work on the URL standard moving towards a more sane (but still working practically within the constraints of compat) location object and URI parsing in the browser.
PermalinkComments

The Doritos origin story: Repurposed garbage from Disneyland

2014 May 6, 7:16

shortformblog:

A reminder that those Doritos you love are trash:

Shortly after Disneyland opened in 1955, the founder of Frito-Lay got permission from Walt Disney to open a restaurant in Frontierland with a Mexican-ish theme. “Casa de Fritos” was, unsurprisingly, all about the Fritos. Customers got free Fritos, and Fritos were incorporated into many of the dishes. Fritos were dispensed by an animatronic vending machine that featured the terrifying “Frito Kid”asking his assistant “Klondike” to bring the bag up from a mineshaft. I guess the conceit is that Fritos were mined by Forty-Niners?

Casa de Fritos contracted their tortilla production to a company called Alex Foods. One of the salesmen from Alex Foods, making a delivery to Casa de Fritos, noticed stale tortillas in the garbage and gave the cook a little tip: fry them and sell them as chips instead of throwing them away. Casa de Fritos began making these fried, seasoned chips to enormous success, but didn’t report this new menu item to the Frito-Lay company.

Eventually Frito-Lay found out what they were doing with the chips, packaged them, and sold them by the truckload. See, dumpster diving works out sometimes!

PermalinkComments

weeping-who-girl: Matt & David on Chris Hardwick’s Comic...

2014 Apr 8, 7:04




















weeping-who-girl:

Matt & David on Chris Hardwick’s Comic Con Blunder (x)

requested by tennanttardistime

Bonus Chris Hardwick in costume:

image

PermalinkCommentshumor doctor-who chris-hardwick

Setting up HTTP server on Windows with Node.js | JHH's blog

2014 Mar 11, 3:09PermalinkCommentstechnical windows node http

Debugging LoadLibrary Failures - Junfeng Zhang's Windows Programming Notes - Site Home - MSDN Blogs

2014 Feb 25, 2:22

How to turn on debug logging for LoadLibrary to diagnose failures. For example, see where in the dependency graph of a DLL LoadLibrary ran into issues.

PermalinkCommentstechnical win32 windows debugging loadlibrary
Older Entries Creative Commons License Some rights reserved.