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Tweet from David_Risney

2015 Nov 18, 8:29
Next up: hacking phones with inaudible sounds that exploit bugs in this software http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/11/beware-of-ads-that-use-inaudible-sound-to-link-your-phone-tv-tablet-and-pc/ …
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Retweet of runasand

2015 Jul 22, 8:01
Great article about #HackingTeam's third-party acquisition of zero-day vulnerabilities and exploits by @vlad902: http://tsyrklevich.net/2015/07/22/hacking-team-0day-market/ …
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On exploiting security issues in botnet C&C...

2014 Jun 23, 4:26


On exploiting security issues in botnet C&C software:

Hackers “are learning that it’s not so easy to write secure code,” Toro says. “Most of us in the business of securing our applications and systems know that bulletproofing software is an extremely expensive and exhaustive undertaking. Malware creators who have to look to their own defences would have to slow down the production of new attacks.”

FYI, if you want to know what it looks like when you hack a hacker, look no further than the seminal 1995 film Hackers.

PermalinkCommentstechnical security

Hijacking user sessions with the Heartbleed vulnerability · Matt's Life Bytes

2014 Apr 8, 6:36

Just a quick tutorial on exploiting heartbleed for session hijacking. Is it worse to use https than http today?

PermalinkCommentstechnical security ssl heartbleed session-hijack

Microsoft will pay up to $100K for new Windows exploit techniques

2013 Jun 21, 4:29


Good news everyone! Of course Microsoft employees are not eligible but that’s probably for the best.

PermalinkCommentssecurity exploit money microsoft technical

Super Mario World “Completed” in Under 3 Minutes by Corrupting the RAM | minimaxir

2013 Apr 3, 4:46

This is essentially an AV exploit against Super Mario World that results in running the end game code. Watch the video. “…there’s a glitch that’s been known for a while, where Yoshi can end up in the “I have an item in my mouth” state, but not actually have an item in his mouth. When he spits out this nothingness, the game crashes. …That address did not contain code, and so the system crashed. But wait a second. What if, by some sheer coincidence, that address did contain code? The specific address dropped him in somewhere amongst various data for the game’s internal random number generator, and the random number generator can be manipulated in a TAS. Could the game be coerced into running arbitrary code?…”

PermalinkCommentshumor game hack mario

DSL modem hack used to infect millions with banking fraud malware | Ars Technica

2012 Oct 1, 6:33

According to the links within this article, although the root URI of the router requires authentication, the /password.cgi URI doesn’t and the resulting returned HTML contains (but does not display) the plaintext of the password, as well as an HTML FORM to modify the password that is exploitable by CSRF.

The attack… infected more than 4.5 million DSL modems… The CSRF (cross-site request forgery) vulnerability allowed attackers to use a simple script to steal passwords required to remotely log in to and control the devices. The attackers then configured the modems to use malicious domain name system servers that caused users trying to visit popular websites to instead connect to booby-trapped imposter sites.

PermalinkCommentstechnical security html router web dns csrf

Stripe CTF - Level 7

2012 Sep 13, 5:00

Level 7 of the Stripe CTF involved running a length extension attack on the level 7 server's custom crypto code.

Code

@app.route('/logs/')
@require_authentication
def logs(id):
rows = get_logs(id)
return render_template('logs.html', logs=rows)

...

def verify_signature(user_id, sig, raw_params):
# get secret token for user_id
try:
row = g.db.select_one('users', {'id': user_id})
except db.NotFound:
raise BadSignature('no such user_id')
secret = str(row['secret'])

h = hashlib.sha1()
h.update(secret + raw_params)
print 'computed signature', h.hexdigest(), 'for body', repr(raw_params)
if h.hexdigest() != sig:
raise BadSignature('signature does not match')
return True

Issue

The level 7 web app is a web API in which clients submit signed RESTful requests and some actions are restricted to particular clients. The goal is to view the response to one of the restricted actions. The first issue is that there is a logs path to display the previous requests for a user and although the logs path requires the client to be authenticatd, it doesn't restrict the logs you view to be for the user for which you are authenticated. So you can manually change the number in the '/logs/[#]' to '/logs/1' to view the logs for the user ID 1 who can make restricted requests. The level 7 web app can be exploited with replay attacks but you won't find in the logs any of the restricted requests we need to run for our goal. And we can't just modify the requests because they are signed.

However they are signed using their own custom signing code which can be exploited by a length extension attack. All Merkle–Damgård hash algorithms (which includes MD5, and SHA) have the property that if you hash data of the form (secret + data) where data is known and the length but not content of secret is known you can construct the hash for a new message (secret + data + padding + newdata) where newdata is whatever you like and padding is determined using newdata, data, and the length of secret. You can find a sha-padding.py script on VNSecurity blog that will tell you the new hash and padding per the above. With that I produced my new restricted request based on another user's previous request. The original request was the following.

count=10&lat=37.351&user_id=1&long=%2D119.827&waffle=eggo|sig:8dbd9dfa60ef3964b1ee0785a68760af8658048c
The new request with padding and my new content was the following.
count=10&lat=37.351&user_id=1&long=%2D119.827&waffle=eggo%80%02%28&waffle=liege|sig:8dbd9dfa60ef3964b1ee0785a68760af8658048c
My new data in the new request is able to overwrite the waffle parameter because their parser fills in a map without checking if the parameter existed previously.

Notes

Code review red flags included custom crypto looking code. However I am not a crypto expert and it was difficult for me to find the solution to this level.

PermalinkCommentshash internet length-extension security sha1 stripe-ctf technical web

Stripe CTF - SQL injections (Levels 0 & 3)

2012 Sep 5, 9:10

Stripe's web security CTF's level 0 and level 3 had SQL injection solutions described below.

Level 0

Code

app.get('/*', function(req, res) {
var namespace = req.param('namespace');

if (namespace) {
var query = 'SELECT * FROM secrets WHERE key LIKE ? || ".%"';
db.all(query, namespace, function(err, secrets) {

Issue

There's no input validation on the namespace parameter and it is injected into the SQL query with no encoding applied. This means you can use the '%' character as the namespace which is the wildcard character matching all secrets.

Notes

Code review red flag was using strings to query the database. Additional levels made this harder to exploit by using an API with objects to construct a query rather than strings and by running a query that only returned a single row, only ran a single command, and didn't just dump out the results of the query to the caller.

Level 3

Code

@app.route('/login', methods=['POST'])
def login():
username = flask.request.form.get('username')
password = flask.request.form.get('password')

if not username:
return "Must provide username\n"

if not password:
return "Must provide password\n"

conn = sqlite3.connect(os.path.join(data_dir, 'users.db'))
cursor = conn.cursor()

query = """SELECT id, password_hash, salt FROM users
WHERE username = '{0}' LIMIT 1""".format(username)
cursor.execute(query)

res = cursor.fetchone()
if not res:
return "There's no such user {0}!\n".format(username)
user_id, password_hash, salt = res

calculated_hash = hashlib.sha256(password + salt)
if calculated_hash.hexdigest() != password_hash:
return "That's not the password for {0}!\n".format(username)

Issue

There's little input validation on username before it is used to constrcut a SQL query. There's no encoding applied when constructing the SQL query string which is used to, given a username, produce the hashed password and the associated salt. Accordingly one can make username a part of a SQL query command which ensures the original select returns nothing and provide a new SELECT via a UNION that returns some literal values for the hash and salt. For instance the following in blue is the query template and the red is the username injected SQL code:

SELECT id, password_hash, salt FROM users WHERE username = 'doesntexist' UNION SELECT id, ('5e884898da28047151d0e56f8dc6292773603d0d6aabbdd62a11ef721d1542d8') AS password_hash, ('word') AS salt FROM users WHERE username = 'bob' LIMIT 1
In the above I've supplied my own salt and hash such that my salt (word) plus my password (pass) hashed produce the hash I provided above. Accordingly, by providing the above long and interesting looking username and password as 'pass' I can login as any user.

Notes

Code review red flag is again using strings to query the database. Although this level was made more difficult by using an API that returns only a single row and by using the execute method which only runs one command. I was forced to (as a SQL noob) learn the syntax of SELECT in order to figure out UNION and how to return my own literal values.

PermalinkCommentssecurity sql sql-injection technical web-security

Web Security Contest - Stripe CTF

2012 Aug 27, 4:18

Stripe is running a web security capture the flag - a series of increasingly difficult web security exploit challenges. I've finished it and had a lot of fun. Working on a web browser I knew the theory of these various web based attacks, but this was my first chance to put theory into practice with:

  • No adverse consequences
  • Knowledge that there is a fun security exploit to find
  • Access to the server side source code

Here's a blog post on the CTF behind the scenes setup which has many impressive features including phantom users that can be XSS/CSRF'ed.

I'll have another post on my difficulties and answers for the CTF levels after the contest is over on Wed, but if you're looking for hints, try out the CTF chatroom or the level specific CTF chatroom.

PermalinkCommentscontest security technical

Discovery of new "zero-day" exploit links developers of Stuxnet, Flame

2012 Jun 11, 6:41

As you might have guessed, Flame is also US/Israel produced malware.  From the people who brought you Stuxnet, its… Flame!

PermalinkCommentstechnical security malware politics internet microsoft

A Tale Of Two Pwnies (Part 2)

2012 Jun 11, 6:39

Summary of one of the Chrome security exploits from pwn2own.  Basically XSS into the chrome URI scheme which gives access to special APIs.

PermalinkCommentstechnical browser web-browser security xss

“Zero-day” exploit sales should be key point in cybersecurity debate

2012 Mar 30, 2:40

Intro to the world of the 0day exploit market.

PermalinkCommentssecurity technical 0day internet

Fight Against 1-day Exploits: Diffing Binaries vs Anti-diffing Binaries

2009 Aug 24, 9:52Notes on how bin diff'ing tools work and thoughts on defeating them. "We call the threat "1-day exploits". Just few minutes after the release of patches, binary diffing technique can be used to identify the vulnerabilities that the security patches are remedying."PermalinkCommentsexploit security binary diff tool research technical system:filetype:pdf system:media:document

YouTube - "Weird Al" Yankovic - CNR

2009 Aug 5, 7:22Weird Al relates the awesome exploits of Charles Nelson Reilly in the style of the White Stripes. Notice the head of Chuck Norris mounted on CNR's trophy wall at 0:55s.PermalinkCommentshumor video weird-al charles-nelson-reilly music music-video

Analysis of the Green Dam Censorware System

2009 Jun 12, 12:20"We have discovered remotely-exploitable vulnerabilities in Green Dam, the censorship software reportedly mandated by the Chinese government. Any web site a Green Dam user visits can take control of the PC. According to press reports, China will soon require all PCs sold in the country to include Green Dam. This software monitors web sites visited and other activity on the computer and blocks adult content as well as politically sensitive material."PermalinkCommentscensorship china hack security internet greendam

Issue 9860 - chromium - ChromeHTML URI handler vulnerability - Google Code

2009 May 3, 10:26Seems very similar to that ShellExecute/Firefox app URL protocol handler exploit last year. "A vulnerability in the ChromeHTML URI handler allows an attacker to bypass the Same Origin Policy for any site and also enumerate victims files and directories. When loaded in Internet Explorer, a specially crafted HTML page can launch Google Chrome with an arbitrary URI without requiring any user interaction."PermalinkCommentsexploit security google chrome browser web url protocol

Security Research & Defense : Released build of Internet Explorer 8 blocks Dowd/Sotirov ASLR+DEP .NET bypass

2009 Mar 23, 12:58Details on a particular browser exploit and how its been resolved in IE8. "One approach they presented allowed attackers to use .NET framework DLL's to allocate executable pages of memory at predictable locations within the iexplore.exe process. They were then able to demonstrate how .NET behavior could be combined with a separate exploitable memory corruption vulnerability to run arbitrary code."PermalinkCommentssecurity ie8 ie browser hack via:ericlaw

Shoulder Surfing a Malicious PDF Author - Didier Stevens

2008 Nov 13, 10:21"Ever since I read about the incremental updates feature of the PDF file format, I've been patiently waiting for a malicious PDF document with incremental updates to come my way. Thanks to Bojan, that day has finally arrived."PermalinkCommentspdf security javascript exploit malware adobe

How renters work the system to live for free in one of America's most expensive cities - News - SF Weeklypage 4 - SF Weekly

2008 Aug 18, 3:46Legal corner case bugs exploited for free rent in SF. "Getzow is getting pretty well known along the Polk Street corridor. Unlike other serial evictees, who move among different neighborhoods, all of his eight evictions in San Francisco have occurred in a 20-block area known as Lower Nob Hill."PermalinkCommentsarticle legal rent house eviction san-francisco
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