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URI Percent Encoding Ignorance Level 0 - Existence

2012 Feb 10, 4:00

As a professional URI aficionado I deal with various levels of ignorance on URI percent-encoding (aka URI encoding, or URL escaping). The basest ignorance is with respect to the mere existence of percent-encoding. Percents in URIs are special: they always represent the start of a percent-encoded octet. That is to say, a percent is always followed by two hex digits that represents a value between 0 and 255 and doesn't show up in a URI otherwise.

The IPv6 textual syntax for scoped addresses uses the '%' to delimit the zone ID from the rest of the address. When it came time to define how to represent scoped IPv6 addresses in URIs there were two camps: Folks who wanted to use the IPv6 format as is in the URI, and those who wanted to encode or replace the '%' with a different character. The resulting thread was more lively than what shows up on the IETF URI discussion mailing list. Ultimately we went with a percent-encoded '%' which means the percent maintains its special status and singular purpose.

PermalinkCommentsencoding uri technical ietf percent-encoding ipv6

Experiences from an IPv6-Only Network

2011 Apr 30, 4:05"This document discusses our experiences from moving a small number of users to an IPv6-only network, with access to the IPv4-only parts of the Internet via a NAT64 device. The document covers practical experiences as well as road blocks and opportunities for this type of a network setup. The document also makes some recommendations about where such networks are applicable and what should be taken into account in the network design. The document also discusses further work that is needed to make IPv6-only networking applicable in all environments."PermalinkCommentsinternet ip ipv6 ipv4 nat technical reference

draft-denog-v6ops-addresspartnaming-03 - Naming IPv6 address parts

2011 Apr 6, 3:52Humorous quote from the doc: "While we readily agree that the naming of IPv6 address parts is not the most pressing concern the Internet is facing today, a common nomenclature is important for efficient communication."PermalinkCommentshumor technical ipv6 name documentation ietf rfc

The Curious History of Uniform Resource Names - IETF Journal

2010 Jul 1, 10:51"Sometimes it’s hard to judge whether an engineering effort has been successful or not. It can take years for an idea to catch on, to go from being the butt of jokes to becoming an international imperative (IPv6). Uniform Resource Names (URNs), which are part of the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) family, are conceptually at least as old as IPv6. While not figuring in international directives for deployment, they-and the technology engineered to resolve them-are still going concerns."PermalinkCommentsietf urn uri history technical internet url

RFC 5514 - IPv6 over Social Networks

2009 Apr 1, 10:42Lol at actual Facebook app that does IPv6 over Facebook. "...most network users are not aware of what IPv6 is or are even afraid by IPv6 because it is unknown. On the other hand, Social Networks (like Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.) are well-known by users and the usage of those networks is huge... With IPv6 over Social Network (IPoSN): * Every user is a router with at least one loopback interface; * Every friend or connection between users will be used as a point-to-point link... A working prototype has been developed by the author and is freely available: IPv6 over Facebook Social Network [IPv6overFacebook]."PermalinkCommentshumor social network ipv6 ip iposn facebook ietf rfc

Internet Explorer 8 Released

2009 Mar 20, 6:18

Our Fearless Leader reveals IE8 at MIX09. Photo by DBegley.IE8, the software I've been working on for some time now, has finally been released at MIX09.

As I mentioned previously, I worked on accelerators (previously named Activities) in IE8. Looking at the kinds of things I blog about on the IE Blog, you might also correctly guess that I work on the networking stack. Ask me about what else I worked on during IE8 development. The past few months were very busy for me and I'm happy this is finally out.PermalinkCommentstechnical internet explorer ie8

IPv6 Roundup: Address Syntax on Windows

2008 Jan 9, 11:34

IPv6 address syntax consists of 8 groupings of colon delimited 16-bit hex values making up the 128-bit address. An optional double colon can replace any consecutive sequence of 0 valued hex values. For example the following is a valid IPv6 address: fe80::2c02:db79

Some IPv6 addresses aren't global and in those cases need a scope ID to describe their context. These get a '%' followed by the scope ID. For example the previous example with a scope ID of '8' would be: fe80::2c02:db79%8

IPv6 addresses in URIs may appear in the host section of a URI as long as they're enclosed by square brackets. For example: http://[fe80::2c02:db79]/. The RFC explicitly notes that there isn't a way to add a scope ID to the IPv6 address in a URI. However a draft document describes adding scope IDs to IPv6 addresses in URIs. The draft document uses the IPvFuture production from the URI RFC with a 'v1' to add a new hostname syntax and a '+' instead of a '%' for delimiting the scope id. For example: http://[v1.fe80::2c02:db79+8]/. However, this is still a draft document, not a final standard, and I don't know of any system that works this way.

In Windows XPSP2 the IPv6 stack is available but disabled by default. To enable the IPv6 stack, at a command prompt run 'netsh interface ipv6 install'. In Vista IPv6 is the on by default and cannot be turned off, while the IPv4 stack is optional and may be turned off by a command similar to the previous.

Once you have IPv6 on in your OS you can turn on IPv6 for IIS6 or just use IIS7. The address ::1 refers to the local machine.

In some places in Windows like UNC paths, IPv6 addresses aren't allowed. In those cases you can use a Vista DNS IPv6 hack that lives in the OS name resolution stack that transforms particularly crafted names into IPv6 addresses. Take your IPv6 address, replace the ':'s with '-'s and the '%' with an 's' and then append '.ipv6-literal.net' to the end. For example: fe80--2c02-db79s8.ipv6-literal.net. That name will resolve to the same example I've been using in Vista. This transformation occurs inside the system's local name resolution stack so no DNS servers are involved, although Microsoft does own the ipv6-literal.net domain name.

MSDN describes IPv6 addresses in URIs in Windows and I've described IPv6 addresses in URIs in IE7. File URIs in IE7 don't support IPv6 addresses. If you want to put a scope ID in a URI in IE7 you use a '%25' to delimit the scope ID and due to a bug you must have at least two digits in your scope ID. So, to take the previous example: http://[fe80::2c02:db79%2508]/. Note that its 08 rather than just 8.

PermalinkCommentsroundup ip windows ipv6 technical microsoft boring syntax

IEBlog: URI Comparison Functions

2007 Oct 24, 6:20I have a new post on the IE Blog on the topic of Win32 URI Comparison Functions.
I've blogged there previously on the topics of IPv6 URIs in IE7, International Mailto URIs in IE7, File URIs in Windows, and CreateURLMoniker Considered Harmful. Hooray for URIs!PermalinkCommentsmicrosoft technical blog url win32 ie windows uri

IEBlog : IPv6 URIs in IE7

2007 Feb 20, 12:32My IE blog post on IPv6 URI support in IE7.PermalinkCommentsie ie7 blog ipv6 ip uri browser reference me neat-fp

IPv6 for Microsoft Windows: Frequently Asked Questions

2007 Jan 16, 6:02How to enable your IPv6 stack on Windows XP.PermalinkCommentshowto reference windows ipv6 faq install

Scope-ID in IPv6 URIs at Microsoft

2007 Jan 8, 5:25MSDN article talking about scope-ids in IPv6 literals in URIs.PermalinkCommentsmsdn microsoft reference ipv6 ip internet scope-id

RFC 2462 (rfc2462) - IPv6 Stateless Address Autoconfiguration

2005 Nov 30, 3:46PermalinkCommentsipv6 rfc reference internet ip

RFC 2529 (rfc2529) - Transmission of IPv6 over IPv4 Domains without Explic

2005 Nov 30, 3:45PermalinkCommentsreference rfc internet ip ipv6

A Format for IPv6 Scope Zone Identifiers in Literal URIs

2005 Jul 4, 9:22PermalinkCommentsip ipv6 uri reference internet scope-id ietf

RFC 4007 (rfc4007) - IPv6 Scoped Address Architecture

2005 Jul 3, 1:45PermalinkCommentsrfc ip ipv6 reference specification internet

RFC 4291 (rfc4291) - IP Version 6 Addressing Architecture

2005 Apr 29, 11:55PermalinkCommentsrfc reference ipv6 ip internet
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