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Scrollbars in EdgeHtml WebView and Edge browser

2019 Aug 22, 5:35

The scrollbars in UWP WebView and in Edge have different default behavior leading to many emails to my team. (Everything I talk about here is for the EdgeHtml based WebView and Edge browser and does not apply to the Chromium based Edge browser and WebView2).

There is a Edge only -ms-overflow-style CSS property that controls scroll behavior. We have a different default for this in the WebView as compared to the Edge browser. If you want the appearance of the scrollbar in the WebView to match the browser then you must explicitly set that CSS property. The Edge browser default is scrollbar which gives us a Windows desktop styled non-auto-hiding scrollbar. The WebView default is -ms-autohiding-scrollbar which gives a sort of compromise between desktop and UWP app scrollbar behavior. In this configuration it is auto-hiding. When used with the mouse you'll get Windows desktop styled scrollbars and when used with touch you'll get the UWP styled scrollbars.

Since WebViews are intended to be used in apps this style is the default in order to better match the app's scrollbars. However this difference between the browser and WebView has led to confusion.

Here’s an -ms-overflow-style JSFiddle showing the difference between the two styles. Try it in the Edge browser and in WebView. An easy way to try it in the Edge WebView is using the JavaScript Browser.

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Edge browser and JavaScript UWP app security model comparison

2018 Nov 29, 2:21

There are two main differences in terms of security between a JavaScript UWP app and the Edge browser:

Process Model

A JavaScript UWP app has one process (technically not true with background tasks and other edge cases but ignoring that for the moment) that runs in the corresponding appcontainer defined by the app's appx manifest. This one process is where edgehtml is loaded and is rendering HTML, talking to the network, and executing script. Specifically, the UWP main UI thread is the one where your script is running and calling into WinRT.

In the Edge browser there is a browser process running in the same appcontainer defined by its appx manifest, but there are also tab processes. These tab processes are running in restricted app containers that have fewer appx capabilities. The browser process has XAML loaded and coordinates between tabs and handles some (non-WinRT) brokering from the tab processes. The tab processes load edgehtml and that is where they render HTML, talk to the network and execute script.

There is no way to configure the JavaScript UWP app's process model but using WebViews you can approximate it. You can create out of process WebViews and to some extent configure their capabilities, although not to the same extent as the browser. The WebView processes in this case are similar to the browser's tab processes. See the MSWebViewProcess object for configuring out of process WebView creation. I also implemented out of proc WebView tabs in my JSBrowser fork.

ApplicationContentUriRules

The ApplicationContentUriRules (ACUR) section of the appx manifest lets an application define what URIs are considered app code. See a previous post for the list of ACUR effects.

Notably app code is able to access WinRT APIs. Because of this, DOM security restrictions are loosended to match what is possible with WinRT.

Privileged DOM APIs like geolocation, camera, mic etc require a user prompt in the browser before use. App code does not show the same browser prompt. There still may be an OS prompt – the same prompt that applies to any UWP app, but that’s usually per app not per origin.

App code also gets to use XMLHttpRequest or fetch to access cross origin content. Because UWP apps have separate state, cross origin here might not mean much to an attacker unless your app also has the user login to Facebook or some other interesting cross origin target.

PermalinkCommentsedge javascript security uwp web-security wwa

Windows.Web.UI.Interop.WebViewControl localhost access

2018 Jul 25, 5:34

If you're developing with the new Windows.Web.UI.Interop.WebViewControl you may have noticed you cannot navigate to localhost HTTP servers. This is because the WebViewControl's WebView process is a UWP process. All UWP processes by default cannot use the loopback adapter as a security precaution. For development purposes you can allow localhost access using the checknetisolation command line tool on the WebViewControl's package just as you can for any other UWP app. The command should be the following:

checknetisolation loopbackexempt -a -n=Microsoft.Win32WebViewHost_cw5n1h2txyewy

As a warning checknetisolation is not good on errors. If you attempt to add a package but get its package family name wrong, checknetisolation just says OK:

C:\Users\davris>checknetisolation LoopbackExempt -a -n=Microsoft.BingWeather_4.21.2492.0_x86__8wekyb3d8bbwe
OK.
And if you then list the result of the add with the bad name you'll see the following:
[1] -----------------------------------------------------------------
Name: AppContainer NOT FOUND
SID: S-1-15-...

There's also a UI tool for modifying loopback exemption for packages available on GitHub and also one available with Fiddler.

As an additional note, I mentioned above you can try this for development. Do not do this in shipping products as this turns off the security protection for any consumer of the WebViewControl.

PermalinkCommentschecknetisolation loopback security uwp webview win32webview

Application Content URI Rule effects

2017 Jun 30, 3:01

Previously I described Application Content URI Rules (ACUR) parsing and ACUR ordering. This post describes what you get from putting a URI in ACUR.

URIs in the ACUR gain the following which is otherwise unavailable:

  • Geoloc API usage
  • Audio and video capture API usage
  • Pointer lock API usage
  • Web notifications API usage
  • IndexedDB API usage
  • Clipboard API usage
  • window.external.notify access from within webview
  • window.close the primary window
  • Top level navigation in the primary window
  • Cross origin XHR and fetch to ms-appx(-web) scheme URIs
  • Cross origin dirtied canvas read access if dirtied by ms-appx(-web) scheme URIs
  • Cross origin text track for video element for tracks from ms-appx(-web) scheme URIs

URIs in the ACUR that also have full WinRT access additionally gain the following:

  • Cross origin XHR and fetch
  • Cross origin dirtied canvas read access
  • Cross origin text track for video element
  • Local audio and video WinRT plugins work with media elements
PermalinkCommentsapplication-content-uri-rules coding javascript programming windows-store

Application Content URI Rules rule ordering

2017 Jun 1, 1:30

Application Content URI Rules (ACUR from now on) defines the bounds on the web that make up a Microsoft Store application. The previous blog post discussed the syntax of the Rule's Match attribute and this time I'll write about the interactions between the Rules elements.

Order

A single ApplicationContentUriRules element may have up to 100 Rule child elements. When determining if a navigation URI matches any of the ACUR the last Rule in the list with a matching match wildcard URI is used. If that Rule is an include rule then the navigation URI is determined to be an application content URI and if that Rule is an exclude rule then the navigation rule is not an application content URI. For example:

Rule Type='include' Match='https://example.com/'/
Rule Type='exclude' Match='https://example.com/'/

Given the above two rules in that order, the navigation URI https://example.com/ is not an application content URI because the last matching rule is the exclude rule. Reverse the order of the rules and get the opposite result.

WindowsRuntimeAccess

In addition to determining if a navigation URI is application content or not, a Rule may also confer varying levels of WinRT access via the optional WindowsRuntimeAccess attribute which may be set to 'none', 'allowForWeb', or 'all'. If a navigation URI matches multiple different include rules only the last rule is applied even as it applies to the WindowsRuntimeAccess attribute. For example:

Rule Type='include' Match='https://example.com/' WindowsRuntimeAccess='none'/
Rule Type='include' Match='https://example.com/' WindowsRuntimeAccess='all'/

Given the above two rules in that order, the navigation URI https://example.com/ will have access to all WinRT APIs because the last matching rule wins. Reverse the rule order and the navigation URI https://example.com/ will have no access to WinRT. There is no summation or combining of multiple matching rules - only the last matching rule wins.

PermalinkCommentsapplication-content-uri-rules programming uri windows windows-store

Tweet from NASA Planetquest

2017 Jan 26, 10:25
See another solar system! These are real images of a 4-planet system ~130 light-years from . Read about it: http://go.nasa.gov/2kySSt1 
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Tweet from Seth Abramson

2017 Jan 22, 5:21
Retweet if you want networks to stop booking Kellyanne Conway, the first U.S. presidential counselor to openly advocate lying to the public.
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Tweet from David Risney

2016 Nov 20, 2:47
Just fun: draw a sketch and see how fast a Google neural net takes to figure out what it is https://quickdraw.withgoogle.com/# 
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Let's Encrypt NearlyFreeSpeech.net Update

2016 Nov 5, 8:59

Since I had last posted about using Let's Encrypt with NearlyFreeSpeech, NFS has changed their process for setting TLS info. Instead of putting the various files in /home/protected/ssl and submitting an assistance request, now there is a command to submit the certificate info and a webpage for submitting the certificate info.

The webpage is https://members.nearlyfreespeech.net/{username}/sites/{sitename}/add_tls and has a textbox for you to paste in all the cert info in PEM form into the textbox. The domain key, the domain certificate, and the Let's Encrypt intermediate cert must be pasted into the textbox and submitted.

Alternatively, that same info may be provided as standard input to nfsn -i set-tls

To renew my certificate with the updated NFS process I followed the commands from Andrei Damian-Fekete's script which depends on acme_tiny.py:

python acme_tiny.py --account-key account.key --csr domain.csr --acme-dir /home/public/.well-known/acme-challenge/ > signed.crt
wget -O - https://letsencrypt.org/certs/lets-encrypt-x3-cross-signed.pem > intermediate.pem
cat domain.key signed.crt intermediate.pem > chained.pem
nfsn -i set-tls < chained.pem
Because my certificate had already expired I needed to comment out the section in acme_tiny.py that validates the challenge file. The filenames in the above map to the following:
  • signed.crt is the Let's Encrypt provided certificate
  • account.key is the user private key registered with LE
  • domain.csr is the cert request
  • domain.key is the key for the domain cert
PermalinkCommentscertificate lets-encrypt nearlyfreespeech.net

Tweet from David Risney

2016 Nov 2, 1:16
@osterman @ericlaw 'CLR cooks' I assume means you get the .NET projection of the WinRT APIs? That's good enough for most of my purposes.
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Tweet from David Risney

2016 Nov 2, 9:30
Parsing WinRT metadata (winmd files) is much easier than last time I tried. There's support in .NET reflection APIs https://deletethis.net/dave/2016-11/Parsing+WinMD+with+.NET+reflection+APIs 
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Parsing WinMD with .NET reflection APIs

2016 Nov 2, 6:13

Parsing WinMD files, the containers of WinRT API metadata, is relatively simple using the appropriate .NET reflection APIs. However, figuring out which reflection APIs to use is not obvious. I've got a completed C sharp class parsing WinMD files that you can check out for reference.

Use System.Reflection.Assembly.ReflectionOnlyLoad to load the WinMD file. Don't use the normal load methods because the WinMD files contain only metadata. This will load up info about APIs defined in that WinMD, but any references to types outside of that WinMD including types found in the normal OS system WinMD files must be resolved by the app code via the System.Reflection.InteropServices.WindowsRuntimeMetadata.ReflectionOnlyNamespaceResolve event.

In this event handler you must resolve the unknown namespace reference by adding an assembly to the NamespaceResolveEventArgs's ResolvedAssemblies property. If you're only interested in OS system WinMD files you can use System.Reflection.InteropServices.WindowsRuntimeMetadata.ResolveNamespace to turn a namespace into the expected OS system WinMD path and turn that path into an assembly with ReflectionOnlyLoad.

PermalinkComments.net code programming winmd winrt

Tweet from David Risney

2016 Oct 20, 4:09
Surprised ICANN doc doesn't cover intranet name collisions issues http://archive.icann.org/en/topics/dns-stability-draft-paper-06feb08.pdf  Does consider file ext collisions: no problem... https://twitter.com/kpyke/status/789156391726387200 
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Tweet from Acid Burn

2016 Oct 12, 1:14
HACK THE PLANET! HACK THE PLANET!
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Tweet from David Risney

2016 Sep 19, 3:04
Playing No Man's Sky collecting resources on an hospitable planet and suddenly notice several creatures approaching. I quickly scan them.
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Tweet from David Risney

2016 Sep 8, 3:05
Planet vs dwarf planet pluto controversy similar to 'is a hotdog a sandwich' controversy. http://www.smbc-comics.com/comic/space 
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Tweet from Pwn All The Things

2016 Sep 6, 10:47
Oh My God. This report is such a troll. Hackers cleverly hid their searching of network shares using "SMB protocol"
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Tweet from David Risney

2016 Aug 18, 6:28
Is Internet a public place? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmZbdaqGqlc  Place? No, a process that acts like place. Public? Sort of. See Mall related case law
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Tweet from David Risney

2016 Aug 5, 3:20
I've put my WPAD DHCP server Fiddler extension up on GitHub https://deletethis.net/dave/2016-08/WPAD+Server+Fiddler+Extension+Source 
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WPAD Server Fiddler Extension Source

2016 Aug 5, 3:18

I've put my WPAD Fiddler extension source and the installer on GitHub.

Six years ago I made a WPAD DHCP server Fiddler extension (described previously and previously). The extension runs a WPAD DHCP server telling any clients that connect to connect to the running Fiddler instance. I've finally got around to putting the source on GitHub. I haven't touched it in five or so years so this is either for posterity or education or something.

PermalinkCommentsdhcp fiddler network security wpad
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