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Tweet from Garrett Serack

2016 Aug 18, 2:57
For the record, yes you can run on Linux in Bash on Windows (aka ) /cc @bitcrazed @bradwilson
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WinRT Toast from PowerShell

2016 Jun 15, 3:54

I've made a PowerShell script to show system toast notifications with WinRT and PowerShell. Along the way I learned several interesting things.

First off calling WinRT from PowerShell involves a strange syntax. If you want to use a class you write [-Class-,-Namespace-,ContentType=WindowsRuntime] first to tell PowerShell about the type. For example here I create a ToastNotification object:

[void][Windows.UI.Notifications.ToastNotification,Windows.UI.Notifications,ContentType=WindowsRuntime];
$toast = New-Object Windows.UI.Notifications.ToastNotification -ArgumentList $xml;
And here I call the static method CreateToastNotifier on the ToastNotificationManager class:
[void][Windows.UI.Notifications.ToastNotificationManager,Windows.UI.Notifications,ContentType=WindowsRuntime];
$notifier = [Windows.UI.Notifications.ToastNotificationManager]::CreateToastNotifier($AppUserModelId);
With this I can call WinRT methods and this is enough to show a toast but to handle the click requires a little more work.

To handle the user clicking on the toast I need to listen to the Activated event on the Toast object. However Register-ObjectEvent doesn't handle WinRT events. To work around this I created a .NET event wrapper class to turn the WinRT event into a .NET event that Register-ObjectEvent can handle. This is based on Keith Hill's blog post on calling WinRT async methods in PowerShell. With the event wrapper class I can run the following to subscribe to the event:

function WrapToastEvent {
param($target, $eventName);

Add-Type -Path (Join-Path $myPath "PoshWinRT.dll")
$wrapper = new-object "PoshWinRT.EventWrapper[Windows.UI.Notifications.ToastNotification,System.Object]";
$wrapper.Register($target, $eventName);
}

[void](Register-ObjectEvent -InputObject (WrapToastEvent $toast "Activated") -EventName FireEvent -Action {
...
});

To handle the Activated event I want to put focus back on the PowerShell window that created the toast. To do this I need to call the Win32 function SetForegroundWindow. Doing so from PowerShell is surprisingly easy. First you must tell PowerShell about the function:

Add-Type @"
using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
public class PInvoke {
[DllImport("user32.dll")] [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
public static extern bool SetForegroundWindow(IntPtr hwnd);
}
"@
Then to call:
[PInvoke]::SetForegroundWindow((Get-Process -id $myWindowPid).MainWindowHandle);

But figuring out the HWND to give to SetForegroundWindow isn't totally straight forward. Get-Process exposes a MainWindowHandle property but if you start a cmd.exe prompt and then run PowerShell inside of that, the PowerShell process has 0 for its MainWindowHandle property. We must follow up process parents until we find one with a MainWindowHandle:

$myWindowPid = $pid;
while ($myWindowPid -gt 0 -and (Get-Process -id $myWindowPid).MainWindowHandle -eq 0) {
$myWindowPid = (gwmi Win32_Process -filter "processid = $($myWindowPid)" | select ParentProcessId).ParentProcessId;
}
PermalinkComments.net c# powershell toast winrt

WinRT Launcher API in PowerShell

2016 Mar 31, 10:12
You can call WinRT APIs from PowerShell. Here's a short example using the WinRT Launcher API:
[Windows.System.Launcher,Windows.System,ContentType=WindowsRuntime]
$uri = New-Object System.Uri "http://example.com/"
[Windows.System.Launcher]::LaunchUriAsync($uri)
Note that like using WinRT in .NET, you use the System.Uri .NET class instead of the Windows.Foundation.Uri WinRT class which is not projected and under the covers the system will convert the System.Uri to a Windows.Foundation.Uri.
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Retweet of tombkeeper

2015 Nov 11, 11:07
Another demo of our talk "BadBarcode" in PacSec 2015: start a shell by one single boarding pass.
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Retweet of olemoudi

2015 Sep 18, 4:21
Shell-XSS: Never trust cat again http://openwall.com/lists/oss-security/2015/09/17/5 …
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Retweet of bl4sty

2015 Jul 9, 1:36
A wise friend once said: "All I know is that the 'sh' in flash stands for shell" -- @brainsmoke
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Tweet from David_Risney

2015 Apr 9, 4:34
Scripting in cdb/kd is not pleasant. Using PowerShell to script cdb/kd instead: http://www.leeholmes.com/blog/2009/01/21/scripting-windbg-with-powershell/ … . Any other better ways?
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Tweet from David_Risney

2015 Mar 20, 10:30
VHD in PowerShell: easy. Find drive letter: hard. Mount-DiskImage $vhd; Get-Partition -DiskNumber (Get-DiskImage -ImagePath $vhd).Number
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Retweet of PuN1sh_3r

2015 Feb 18, 6:40
PowerShell: Better phishing for all! http://d.uijn.nl/?p=116 
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Tweet from David_Risney

2015 Feb 1, 8:13
Presently enjoying Ghost in the Shell Arise. Only somewhat confused hearing voices of old Major and Piccolo out of different characters
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Image Manipulation in PowerShell - Windows PowerShell Blog - Site Home - MSDN Blogs

2015 Jan 5, 1:20

Great blog post and set of powershell scripts for manipulating images.

PermalinkCommentsprogramming coding powershell

Image Manipulation in PowerShell - Windows PowerShell Blog - Site Home - MSDN Blogs

2015 Jan 5, 1:20

Great blog post and set of powershell scripts for manipulating images.

PermalinkCommentsprogramming coding powershell

exec($_GET

2014 Apr 29, 8:27

Does it betray my innocence that I’m shocked by the amount of exec($_GET you can easily find on github? Hilarious comment thread on hacker news: 

This is awful. Shell commands are not guaranteed to be idempotent, people! These should all be of the form exec($_POST, not exec($_GET.

ephemeralgomi

PermalinkCommentshumor security http php technical

Moving PowerShell data into Excel

2013 Aug 15, 10:04
PowerShell nicely includes ConvertTo-CSV and ConvertFrom-CSV which allow you to serialize and deserialize your PowerShell objects to and from CSV. Unfortunately the CSV produced by ConvertTo-CSV is not easily opened by Excel which expects by default different sets of delimiters and such. Looking online you'll find folks who recommend using automation via COM to create a new Excel instance and copy over the data in that fashion. This turns out to be very slow and impractical if you have large sets of data. However you can use automation to open CSV files with not the default set of delimiters. So the following isn't the best but it gets Excel to open a CSV file produced via ConvertTo-CSV and is faster than the other options:
Param([Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][string]$Path);

$excel = New-Object -ComObject Excel.Application

$xlWindows=2
$xlDelimited=1 # 1 = delimited, 2 = fixed width
$xlTextQualifierDoubleQuote=1 # 1= doublt quote, -4142 = no delim, 2 = single quote
$consequitiveDelim = $False;
$tabDelim = $False;
$semicolonDelim = $False;
$commaDelim = $True;
$StartRow=1
$Semicolon=$True

$excel.visible=$true
$excel.workbooks.OpenText($Path,$xlWindows,$StartRow,$xlDelimited,$xlTextQualifierDoubleQuote,$consequitiveDelim,$tabDelim,$semicolonDelim, $commaDelim);
See Workbooks.OpenText documentation for more information.
PermalinkCommentscsv excel powershell programming technical

NICT Daedalus Cyber-attack alert system #DigInfo (by...

2012 Jun 20, 3:23


NICT Daedalus Cyber-attack alert system #DigInfo (by Diginfonews)

Someone has been watching too much Ghost in the Shell. I’d say someone has been watching too much Hackers but this actually looks cooler than their visualizations and also you can never watch too much of Hackers.

PermalinkCommentstechnical network visualization hack security

Permanently Add Path to System PATH Environment Variable in PowerShell

2012 May 17, 7:16
According to MSDN the proper way to permanently add a path to your system's PATH environment variable is by modifying a registry value. Accordingly this is easily represented in a PowerShell script that first checks if the path provided is already there and otherwise appends it:
param([Parameter(Mandatory = $true)] [string] $Path);
$FullPathOriginal = (gp "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Environment").Path;
if (!($FullPathOriginal.split(";") | ?{ $_ -like $Path })) {
sp "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Environment" -name Path -value ($FullPathOriginal + ";" +
$Path);
}
PermalinkCommentspowershell registry technical code programming

PowerShell Equivalents for JavaScript Array Functions

2012 May 15, 3:30

Built-in

map
input | %{ expression($_) }
forEach
input | %{ [void]expression($_) }
filter
input | ?{ expression($_) }
indexOf
input.indexOf(value)

Close to built-in

some
if (input | ?{ expression($_) }) { ... }
every
if (-not input | ?{ !expression($_) }) { ... }
lastIndexOf
[array]::lastIndexOf(input, value)

Write it yourself

reduce
function reduce($fn, $a, $init) { $s = $init; $a | %{ $s = &$fn $s $_; }; $s; }
PermalinkCommentsjavascript powershell array technical

URI Percent-Encoding Ignorance Level 1 - Purpose

2012 Feb 15, 4:00

As a professional URI aficionado I deal with various levels of ignorance on URI percent-encoding (aka URI encoding, or URL escaping).

Worse than the lame blog comments hating on percent-encoding is the shipping code which can do actual damage. In one very large project I won't name, I've fixed code that decodes all percent-encoded octets in a URI in order to get rid of pesky percents before calling ShellExecute. An unnamed developer with similar intent but clearly much craftier did the same thing in a loop until the string's length stopped changing. As it turns out percent-encoding serves a purpose and can't just be removed arbitrarily.

Percent-encoding exists so that one can represent data in a URI that would otherwise not be allowed or would be interpretted as a delimiter instead of data. For example, the space character (U+0020) is not allowed in a URI and so must be percent-encoded in order to appear in a URI:

  1. http://example.com/the%20path/
  2. http://example.com/the path/
In the above the first is a valid URI while the second is not valid since a space appears directly in the URI. Depending on the context and the code through which the wannabe URI is run one may get unexpected failure.

For an additional example, the question mark delimits the path from the query. If one wanted the question mark to appear as part of the path rather than delimit the path from the query, it must be percent-encoded:

  1. http://example.com/foo%3Fbar
  2. http://example.com/foo?bar
In the second, the question mark appears plainly and so delimits the path "/foo" from the query "bar". And in the first, the querstion mark is percent-encoded and so the path is "/foo%3Fbar".
PermalinkCommentsencoding uri technical ietf percent-encoding

Using Progress Indicators in Windows PowerShell

2011 Jul 27, 10:33The write-progress command in powershell allows scripts to express their progress in terms of percent or time left and powershell displays this in a friendly manner at the top of my window. Surprisingly, not hooked up to the Shell's TaskbarItemInfo's progress.PermalinkCommentstechnical powershell progress coding shell

Command line for finding missing URLACTIONs

2011 May 28, 11:00

I wanted to ensure that my switch statement in my implementation of IInternetSecurityManager::ProcessURLAction had a case for every possible documented URLACTION. I wrote the following short command line sequence to see the list of all URLACTIONs in the SDK header file not found in my source file:

grep URLACTION urlmon.idl | sed 's/.*\(URLACTION[a-zA-Z0-9_]*\).*/\1/g;' | sort | uniq > allURLACTIONs.txt
grep URLACTION MySecurityManager.cpp | sed 's/.*\(URLACTION[a-zA-Z0-9_]*\).*/\1/g;' | sort | uniq > myURLACTIONs.txt
comm -23 allURLACTIONs.txt myURLACTIONs.txt
I'm not a sed expert so I had to read the sed documentation, and I heard about comm from Kris Kowal's blog which happilly was in the Win32 GNU tools pack I already run.

But in my effort to learn and use PowerShell I found the following similar command line:

diff 
(more urlmon.idl | %{ if ($_ -cmatch "URLACTION[a-zA-Z0-9_]*") { $matches[0] } } | sort -uniq)
(more MySecurityManager.cpp | %{ if ($_ -cmatch "URLACTION[a-zA-Z0-9_]*") { $matches[0] } } | sort -uniq)
In the PowerShell version I can skip the temporary files which is nice. 'diff' is mapped to 'compare-object' which seems similar to comm but with no parameters to filter out the different streams (although this could be done more verbosely with the ?{ } filter syntax). In PowerShell uniq functionality is built into sort. The builtin -cmatch operator (c is for case sensitive) to do regexp is nice plus the side effect of generating the $matches variable with the regexp results.
PermalinkCommentspowershell tool cli technical command line
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